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Pacific Sea Level Monitoring

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The Australian-funded Pacific Sea Level Monitoring (PSLM) network is the only monitoring system of its kind in the Pacific. Since its establishment in 1991, it has provided policy makers, development planners, and scientists in the Pacific Islands with important and reliable information about sea level variability in the region.

Formerly known as the South Pacific Sea Level and Climate Monitoring Project (SPSLCMP), the monitoring array was implemented in 12 member countries as a response to increasing regional concern about climate change-associated sea-level rise.

Over-water monitoring stations in Fiji, Tonga, Samoa, Vanuatu, PNG, RMI, FSM, Kiribati, Cook Islands, Palau, Tuvalu, and Nauru provide a continuous stream of high quality data on sea level, temperature (water and air), barometric pressure and wind speed and direction. In addition, land-based Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) stations measure land movements, providing a geodetic benchmark and accurate relative sea level change.

Processed and analysed data are available to the international community and information products and targeted training are delivered to relevant stakeholders in Pacific Island countries.

The PSLM project is housed under the Climate and Oceans Support Program in the Pacific (COSPPac) managed by the Australian Bureau of Meteorology.

The project aims to provide an accurate long-term record of sea levels in the South Pacific for member countries and the international scientific community, enabling them to respond to and manage related impacts.

Follow the links below to access PSLM data products:

For more information contact:

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Regional Officer, COSPPac

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Senior Project Officer--Surveying
Last Updated on Tuesday, 24 September 2013 10:41  


Newsflash

SOPAC has introduced a navigational positioning service into the region that could make a major contribution in improving the safety of lakes, rivers and the ocean, according to Robert Smith, SOPAC’s Senior Advisor Marine Geophysics, SOPAC is a division of the Secretariat of the Pacific Community (SPC).

Mr Smith said that the service is called MarineSTAR and utilizes a combination of more than 50 satellites, permanently located base stations and a small transmitter/receiver computer called a Rover, that when operated together, can ensure pinpoint accuracy of a location within 10 centimetres.