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Map and Spatial Data Repository

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Map and Spatial Data Repository

SOPAC's core work program involves the production of a lot of geographical information systems output; and these are mostly some combination of digital maps and geo-referenced datasets. GIS specialists within the the work programmes utilize a diverse set of toolsets to create, manage, analyze and display geospatial data on digital maps, which are acquired from diverse sources.  

From 2010, SOPAC ICT has attempted to unify and catalogue SOPAC's diverse spatial data collection under a standardised, secure and user-friendly system, with the goal of having a common platform that will not only make SOPAC’s GIS work more visible to the member countries (and the general public at large), but will also prove endlessly useful to SOPAC staff in their day to day work.

Applied GeoScience and Technology Division (AGTD) has a number of public geospatial data repositories which could be accessed by clicking the product logo's below:

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Last Updated on Sunday, 13 July 2014 19:03  

Newsflash

16 April 2013 - A survey of the South Tarawa lagoon has revealed some potentially explosive secrets from its past as one of the major battlegrounds of WWII. The survey was designed to identify battle debris that still litters the floor of the lagoon seventy years after the infamous Battle of Tarawa in 1943.

Funded by the New Zealand Regional Ocean Sciences Grant, the survey was undertaken as part of the Government’s work to reduce the atoll’s damaging reliance on beach mining by identifying potential sources of construction aggregate on the floor of the Tarawa Lagoon. The widespread practice of beach mining has been weakening the atoll’s vulnerable shoreline along with Government efforts to protect communities from the worsening impacts of climate change and rising sea levels.

The Government turned to SOPAC, the region’s Applied Geoscience & Technology Division of the Secretariat of the Pacific Community, for guidance on safe methods to dredge an alternative source of sand and gravel from Tarawa’s southern lagoon. Before dredging can begin, as part of the European-Union funded Environmentally Safe Aggregate for Tarawa (ESAT) project, SOPAC first needed to identify any potential problems that might be posed by any unidentified and unexploded ordnance.

During WWII, the islands of Kiribati saw some of the Pacific’s bloodiest encounters.  From 20-24 November 1943, an invasion flotilla of 18,000 US Naval and Marine Corps troops attacked the fortified Japanese garrison on Betio in Southern Tarawa. The 4,600 Japanese defenders fought almost to the last man, and more than 1,000 Americans lost their lives.

SOPAC’s Survey Leader, Geophysicist Robert Smith, is still analysing the data but he has already identified two previously unknown vessel wrecks and unearthed numerous artillery remnants. Of the vessels, Smith says, “These may be sunken Higgins boats, which would have carried 20-30 marines each.” The US government has already expressed a keen interest in Smith’s findings.