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Water and Sanitation Services

“Water and Health, Tomorrow’s Wealth”

Ensuring people have access to a reliable supply of clean water and proper sanitation is vital to a nation’s health. The main role of SOPAC’s Water and Sanitation Services Component is to support Pacific island governments and water and wastewater service providers achieve this.

Water Quality Monitoring

The Water Quality Monitoring programme helps build national capacity to monitor the quality of drinking water, surface water, ground water and coastal waters. Countries are provided with basic water testing equipment and in-country training on best laboratory practice. In addition an electronic water quality database has been developed to assist countries better manage and analyse water quality data and link results to a regional back-up database.

Drinking Water Safety Planning

The Drinking Water Safety Planning Programme promotes a risk management approach for the provision of safe water supplies through collaboration between water utilities, regulators and resource managers. The programme supports the country efforts to implement system specific improvements for urban and rural water supplies and supports the involvement of communities in water safety awareness and advocacy.

Water Demand Management

The Water Demand Management Programme seeks to improve the capacity of Pacific urban water utilities to deal with unaccounted-for-water. In-country support is being provided to establish System Loss Management Plans and assist countries acquire both “hardware”, such as water meters, leak detection equipment or bulk water-saving devices for incentive or rebate schemes, and “software”, which includes training, community education materials and technical expertise.

Water Supply, Sanitation and Hygiene

The Water Supply, Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH) programme promotes the use of appropriate technologies and approaches for domestic water supply and sanitation issues through awareness raising, demonstrating best practices and advocacy. This includes rainwater harvesting and mainstreaming gender and community participation in water supply and sanitation. Increasing interest and support by donors and other organisations on the critical issue of water and sanitation has resulted in a large number of overlapping interventions. Ensuring that work carried out is well coordinated, in order to optimise outputs and avoid duplication, has therefore become increasingly important. Partners have been mobilised to coordinate activities through the Pacific WASH Coalition, including coordinated responses in times of natural disasters through the Pacific Humanitarian Team.

Last Updated on Sunday, 20 June 2010 14:38  


Newsflash

Delegations from Pacific governments, along with international donors and prominent scientific organisations will meet in the Cook Islands during the second week of October to investigate and discuss aspects of mineral resources development in the Pacific region.

This will be during the Third meeting of the Secretariat of the Pacific Community's (SPC) Applied Geoscience and Technology Division (SOPAC), whose running theme will be 'Opportunities and challenges of developing natural resources in large ocean states'.

The meeting will be held in conjunction with the 2013 Circum-Pacific Council (CPC) meeting, along with 2013 STAR* (Science, Technology and Resources Network) Session.

Professor Michael Petterson, SOPAC Division Director, expressed his gratitude to the Cook Islands Government for hosting the meetings, and further added that 'As a new Director attending my first Divisional meeting, I am very excited to be able to meet and discuss one of the key aspects of development for the Pacific: sustainably and inclusively developing mineral resources. The advent of Deep Sea Minerals could bring many changes to the Pacific and we all need to prepare and be informed. I will also be presenting my new vision for where I would like to take SOPAC Division during my tenureship. Let us also not forget STAR and the very last year of it's chair, Professor John Collen who has, again, produced a very exciting programme for us to learn from and contribute to. I look forward to seeing everybody and extend a very warm welcome.'

Circum-Pacific Council is an association of earth scientists, engineers, and oceanographers in the Pacific region, while STAR was founded in 1985 to facilitate the continuing provision of advice to SOPAC by the international geoscience community.

The main theme of the STAR Conference is 'Large ocean states: challenges, opportunities and risks in developing non-living marine and onland natural resources', and papers on renewable energy and deep sea minerals will be presented.

For further information, please go to: http://www.sopac.org/index.php/sopac-3