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World Water Day 2010 Address by the SOPAC Director Dr Russell Howorth Nadi, Fiji 26th March,2010

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World Water Day 2010

Communicating Opportunities and Challenges- Safe Water for a Healthy Pacific

Address by the SOPAC Director Dr Russell Howorth
Nadi, Fiji Islands, 26th March 2010

Your Excellency Ambassador Chin, Commissioner Western Joeli Cawaki, Distinguished Guests and School Children, Good Morning.

I would like to welcome you all to the celebration of this year’s World Water Day, which has the theme: Clean Water for a Healthy World. You may be aware that World Water Day has been celebrated annually since 1992 as an outcome of the World Summit on Environment and Development held in Rio, Brazil.

Last Updated on Wednesday, 07 April 2010 13:12 Read more...
 


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Newsflash

16 April 2013 - A survey of the South Tarawa lagoon has revealed some potentially explosive secrets from its past as one of the major battlegrounds of WWII. The survey was designed to identify battle debris that still litters the floor of the lagoon seventy years after the infamous Battle of Tarawa in 1943.

Funded by the New Zealand Regional Ocean Sciences Grant, the survey was undertaken as part of the Government’s work to reduce the atoll’s damaging reliance on beach mining by identifying potential sources of construction aggregate on the floor of the Tarawa Lagoon. The widespread practice of beach mining has been weakening the atoll’s vulnerable shoreline along with Government efforts to protect communities from the worsening impacts of climate change and rising sea levels.

The Government turned to SOPAC, the region’s Applied Geoscience & Technology Division of the Secretariat of the Pacific Community, for guidance on safe methods to dredge an alternative source of sand and gravel from Tarawa’s southern lagoon. Before dredging can begin, as part of the European-Union funded Environmentally Safe Aggregate for Tarawa (ESAT) project, SOPAC first needed to identify any potential problems that might be posed by any unidentified and unexploded ordnance.

During WWII, the islands of Kiribati saw some of the Pacific’s bloodiest encounters.  From 20-24 November 1943, an invasion flotilla of 18,000 US Naval and Marine Corps troops attacked the fortified Japanese garrison on Betio in Southern Tarawa. The 4,600 Japanese defenders fought almost to the last man, and more than 1,000 Americans lost their lives.

SOPAC’s Survey Leader, Geophysicist Robert Smith, is still analysing the data but he has already identified two previously unknown vessel wrecks and unearthed numerous artillery remnants. Of the vessels, Smith says, “These may be sunken Higgins boats, which would have carried 20-30 marines each.” The US government has already expressed a keen interest in Smith’s findings.