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SOPAC-2 Provisional Agenda

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PROVISIONAL AGENDA

3 - 5 November

2012 SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY AND RESOURCES NETWORK (STAR) SESSION

in conjunction with a

CIRCUMPACIFIC COUNCIL SESSION

Theme: The science of a changing world: addressing Pacific issues through the 21st Century

6 - 9 November 2012

SPC/SOPAC DIVISION MEETING

(All delegates to STAR and CPC meeting invited to participate as technical advisers)

Tuesday (Joint session with STAR and CPC)

1    OPENING and WELCOME

1.1    Opening
1.2    Election of Chair
1.3    Adoption of agenda
1.4    Explanation of working procedures

2    REPORTS

2.1    Director’s Report: Introduction
2.2    Report on KRAs
2.3    Report on Highlights
2.4    Report on Emerging Issues and Opportunities
2.5    PMEG reports
2.6    STAR Chair Report

3    SOPAC DIVISION HIGHLIGHTS AND EMERGING ISSUES

Narrative case study presentations by country representatives, SOPAC technical staff and/ or STAR delegates concerning selected activities conducted over the year

3.1    Ocean and Islands Programme 2011/2012 report

3.1.1    Summary Report
3.1.2    Full Narrative Report

3.2    Water and Sanitation Programme 2011/2012 report

3.2.1    Summary Report
3.2.2    Full Narrative Report

3.3    Disaster Reduction Programme 2011/2012 report

3.3.1    Summary Report
3.3.2    Full Narrative Report

3.4    Technical Support Services 2011/2012 report

3.4.1    Summary
3.4.2    Full Narrative Report


Wednesday

4    SUMMARY DISCUSSION FOR CHAIR’S REPORT

5    2013 SOPAC DIVISION WORK PLAN AND BUDGET

Thursday

6    STRATEGIC PLANNING

Presentations and consultations concerning SOPAC Division focus for the remainder of the current Strategic Plan period 2013 – 2015. This will include feedback on PMEG reports, commentary by countries, partner agencies and STAR scientists

Friday

7    ADOPTION OF STATEMENT FOR CONSIDERATION BY CRGA

8    CLOSING
___________________


Last Updated on Tuesday, 09 October 2012 10:07  

Newsflash

By WILLIAM J. BROAD, Source: NYTimes.com

Tom Dettweiler makes his living miles down. He helped find the Titanic. After that, his teams located a lost submarine heavy with gold. In all, he has cast light on dozens of vanished ships.

Mr. Dettweiler has now turned from recovering lost treasures to prospecting for natural ones that litter the seabed: craggy deposits rich in gold and silver, copper and cobalt, lead and zinc. A new understanding of marine geology has led to the discovery of hundreds of these unexpected ore bodies, known as massive sulfides because of their sulfurous nature.

These finds are fueling a gold rush as nations, companies and entrepreneurs race to stake claims to the sulfide-rich areas, which dot the volcanic springs of the frigid seabed. The prospectors — motivated by dwindling resources on land as well as record prices for gold and other metals — are busy hauling up samples and assessing deposits valued at trillions of dollars.

“We’ve had extreme success,” Mr. Dettweiler said in a recent interview about the deepwater efforts of his company, Odyssey Marine Exploration of Tampa, Fla.