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Map and Spatial Data Repository

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Map and Spatial Data Repository

SOPAC's core work program involves the production of a lot of geographical information systems output; and these are mostly some combination of digital maps and geo-referenced datasets. GIS specialists within the the work programmes utilize a diverse set of toolsets to create, manage, analyze and display geospatial data on digital maps, which are acquired from diverse sources.  

From 2010, SOPAC ICT has attempted to unify and catalogue SOPAC's diverse spatial data collection under a standardised, secure and user-friendly system, with the goal of having a common platform that will not only make SOPAC’s GIS work more visible to the member countries (and the general public at large), but will also prove endlessly useful to SOPAC staff in their day to day work.

Applied GeoScience and Technology Division (AGTD) has a number of public geospatial data repositories which could be accessed by clicking the product logo's below:

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Last Updated on Sunday, 13 July 2014 19:03  

Newsflash

TUESDAY 25 SEPTEMBER 2012 - ‘It really is very simple. The workshop is about improving the safety of life at sea.’

Dr Russell Howorth of the Secretariat of the Pacific Community (SPC) made this comment in his opening address of the Hydrographic Surveying and Nautical Charting Workshop, taking place at Fiji’s Naval Headquarters from 24 September to 5 October.

Dr Howorth, Director of SPC Applied Geoscience and Technology Division, said that the aim of the workshop, funded by the International Maritime Organization (IMO) and organised by SPC, is to assist the participating countries to meet the basic requirements of navigation and safety as required and regulated by IMO’s International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea.

‘We must support campaigns to raise awareness of the safety and economic importance of hydrographic surveying and nautical charting services in the region,’ said Dr Howorth.

Hydrographic surveys refer to mapping the seabed, while nautical charts show maritime areas and include features of the seabed, navigational hazards and other details; charts being to ships what roadmaps are to cars.