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Pacific and New Zealand surveying and geospatial professionals join forces for capacity development

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Pacific and New Zealand Professionals join forces

10 Apr 2018 | Nuku’Alofa

The signing of a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) between the Pacific Geospatial and Surveying Council (PGSC) and New Zealand Institute of Surveyors (NZIS) today signals new opportunities to enhance geospatial capacity and professional support in the Pacific Islands. The signing took place during the fourth PGSC meeting currently underway in Tonga and attended by Pacific Island lands survey and geospatial experts. This meeting is held in coordination with the United Nations Initiative on Global Geospatial Information Management (UN-GGIM) International Workshop on Legal & Policy Framework for Geospatial Information.“We are grateful that NZIS has come on board as we need to work with regional partners to advance geospatial and surveying services in the region,” said the chair of the PGSC and Director of Tuvalu Lands and Survey Department, Mr Faatasi Malologa.

 

“The PGSC has developed significantly over the last few years and this is another great step forward.”

President for New Zealand Institute of Surveyors, Ms Rebecca Strang noted, “NZIS will assist in advocating for the development of capability in the Pacific and explain to our own ministers and aid organisations why NZ should share our skills, resources and learnings with you and in turn, learn from you.”  Strang commended the work of the PGSC in developing a comprehensive 10-year Strategy to guide and enhance surveying and geospatial services in the region. She noted that the strategy presented a number of opportunities for NZIS to contribute, and was particularly interested in the establishment of a Young Surveyors Network, noting that a similar initiative has been successful in New Zealand.

The Pacific Community has established the Pacific Geospatial and Surveying Partnership Desk to provide secretariat services and support the PGSC in achieving their goals and objectives. “Members of the PGSC will no doubt benefit from today’s MOU signing as services provided by Pacific geospatial scientists and surveyors support a multitude of industries and sectors and contribute significantly to the security and well-being of Pacific people,” said Deputy Director for Geo-resources and Energy Mr Akuila Tawake.

The PGSC Strategy 2017-2027 will be launched tomorrow evening by The Honourable Prime Minister of Tonga Samiuela ‘Akilisi Pōhiva. The Pacific Geospatial and Surveying Council Strategy is the product of several years of collaborative consultation and design on the part of PGSC members and development partners, including SPC, Geoscience Australia, Land Information New Zealand, the International Federation of Surveyors (FIG), and the United Nations Initiative on Global Geospatial Information Management (UN-GGIM). Made possible by Australian Government funding, it is the first such regional strategy ever produced by a surveying and geospatial body.

 

Media contacts:

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Last Updated on Tuesday, 24 April 2018 09:57  

Newsflash

Rarotonga, Cook Islands 29/08/12 -  At the 43rd Pacific Islands Forum meeting here in Rarotonga this week, a unique event was witnessed when the Leaders of seven (7) Pacific Island Countries signed and exchanged a total of eight (8) Maritime Boundary Agreements which will bring state-of-the-art accuracy and legal clarity to the boundary positions between several overlapping jurisdictions of neighbouring Pacific Island Countries.

This multiple signing event is a remarkable testament of the close kinship and excellent neighbourly relationships between Pacific Islands Countries and underlines their ability to work together in a spirit of equitable and unified progress. By clearly establishing these boundaries and zones under domestic and international law, as set out in the 1982 United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS), the signing of these agreements will provide the foundation for improved governance, protection, conservation and management of resources within respective national jurisdictions.

The seven (7) bilateral treaties were signed by the leaders of the Cook Islands, Niue, Kiribati, Tokelau, Tuvalu, Nauru and the Marshall Islands. In addition, the leaders of Kiribati, Marshall Islands and Nauru agreed to an additional tri-lateral treaty concerning the determination of a point where the Exclusive Economic Zones (EEZs) of all three (3) countries intersect, referred to as a “Tri-junction point”.

The successful preparations of these agreements leading up to the signing event have been a result of the excellent collaborative work between the respective technical and legal country teams and the regional coordination and collaboration with the Applied Geoscience & Technology Division (SOPAC) of the Secretariat of the Pacific Community (SPC), the Pacific Islands Forum Fisheries Agency (FFA), Geoscience Australia, the Government of Australia’s Attorney General’s Office and the Commonwealth Secretariat. The regional funding support towards these SPC activities is provided by AusAID.