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Tuvalu benefits from new Tide Gauge

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Tuvalu benefits

29 May 2017 | Funafuti

Tuvalu can now boast of housing a state-of-the-art Tide Gauge facility which will provide high quality sea level, climate and geodetic information that will assist with better planning and preparedness.

This new tide gauge was officially opened today by the Tuvalu Minister for Communication & Transport, Hon. Monise Laafai with support from the Australian Government and the Pacific Community (SPC).

 

 

 

Situated at the new wharf in Funafuti, the tide gauge will monitor weather, tides, sea level and land movement providing information in real time to the meteorological office. Tuvalu Meteorological office Director, Tauala Katea said the new tide gauge is a big boost for their office as it will assist with providing much more accurate tracking, assessment, forecasting and warnings.

“We are grateful to have this new tide gauge as it will enhance our work and communication to our people on climate and ocean conditions. This new Tide Gauge has a new dual polarised radar which means that we will receive clearer information for forecasting,” Mr Katea said.

The installation of the new tide gauge has been made possible through the Climate and Oceans Support Program in the Pacific (COSPPac), a program managed by the Australian Bureau of Meteorology (BoM) through the support of the Australian Government.

Australia’s High Commissioner for Tuvalu, Amy Crago, said the installation of this tide gauge in Tuvalu is another example of Australia’s commitment towards addressing climate change issues faced in the Pacific.

“We now have 20 tide gauges in the Pacific that provide vital information and support in terms of sustainable growth, adaption and resilience,” Ms Crago said.

While the tide gauge will provide climate and ocean related data and information, it also collects information on land movement from global positioned satellites.

SPC’s Manager for Oceans & Coastal Geoscience, Jens Kruger, said that having this information is important to understand how the land is moving in relation to sea levels which is critical as Funafuti is a low lying island that is susceptible to rising sea levels.

“This facility will provide decision makers with critical information needed for any coastal infrastructure or development,” Mr Kruger said.

The tide gauges provide real time observations and through COSPPac and BoM, SPC is able to publish Annual Tide Predictions which have been of great benefit to local fishermen and women, and related sectors for planning ocean and coastal activities.

This installation is being managed by the Australian Bureau of Meteorology, Geoscience Australia and the Pacific Community.

 

Media contact:

Evlyn Mani, SPC Capacity Development & Communications Officer, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it or +679 3249 222

Last Updated on Wednesday, 26 July 2017 09:55  

Newsflash

Monday 16 September 2013, Secretariat of the Pacific Community (SPC), Suva, Fiji: Fifty-nine staff members of the Secretariat of the Pacific (SPC) staff have completed disaster risk management (DRM) and climate change training in recent months.

Half-day training sessions were held in Suva (Fiji), Honiara (Solomon Islands), Pohnpei (Federated States of Micronesia) and Noumea (New Caledonia), designed to build staff capacity in areas related to climate change and disaster risk management. It is part of a programme of action to mainstream these issues across all of the divisions of SPC.

Because of their impact on social, economic, market and industry sectors, DRM and climate change are considered ‘cross-cutting’ issues, and SPC is integrating such issues into its programmatic approach to development.  This process is referred to as mainstreaming.

SPC is the Pacific region’s principal technical and scientific organisation. Its divisions are involved in research and project implementation in the areas of applied geoscience and technology; public health; fisheries, aquaculture and marine environment; economic development (transport and energy); statistics for development; land resources (agriculture, forestry, land use, animal health, etc.); and education, training and human development.

The training for SPC staff is designed to enable them to better understand DRM and climate change and to factor this professional awareness into personal roles and functions. The training is also designed to enable SPC staff to further contribute to the organisational goal of serving Pacific Island countries and territories (PICTs) by assisting them to mainstream DRM and climate change into national and regional planning processes.