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Tuvalu benefits from new Tide Gauge

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Tuvalu benefits

29 May 2017 | Funafuti

Tuvalu can now boast of housing a state-of-the-art Tide Gauge facility which will provide high quality sea level, climate and geodetic information that will assist with better planning and preparedness.

This new tide gauge was officially opened today by the Tuvalu Minister for Communication & Transport, Hon. Monise Laafai with support from the Australian Government and the Pacific Community (SPC).

 

 

 

Situated at the new wharf in Funafuti, the tide gauge will monitor weather, tides, sea level and land movement providing information in real time to the meteorological office. Tuvalu Meteorological office Director, Tauala Katea said the new tide gauge is a big boost for their office as it will assist with providing much more accurate tracking, assessment, forecasting and warnings.

“We are grateful to have this new tide gauge as it will enhance our work and communication to our people on climate and ocean conditions. This new Tide Gauge has a new dual polarised radar which means that we will receive clearer information for forecasting,” Mr Katea said.

The installation of the new tide gauge has been made possible through the Climate and Oceans Support Program in the Pacific (COSPPac), a program managed by the Australian Bureau of Meteorology (BoM) through the support of the Australian Government.

Australia’s High Commissioner for Tuvalu, Amy Crago, said the installation of this tide gauge in Tuvalu is another example of Australia’s commitment towards addressing climate change issues faced in the Pacific.

“We now have 20 tide gauges in the Pacific that provide vital information and support in terms of sustainable growth, adaption and resilience,” Ms Crago said.

While the tide gauge will provide climate and ocean related data and information, it also collects information on land movement from global positioned satellites.

SPC’s Manager for Oceans & Coastal Geoscience, Jens Kruger, said that having this information is important to understand how the land is moving in relation to sea levels which is critical as Funafuti is a low lying island that is susceptible to rising sea levels.

“This facility will provide decision makers with critical information needed for any coastal infrastructure or development,” Mr Kruger said.

The tide gauges provide real time observations and through COSPPac and BoM, SPC is able to publish Annual Tide Predictions which have been of great benefit to local fishermen and women, and related sectors for planning ocean and coastal activities.

This installation is being managed by the Australian Bureau of Meteorology, Geoscience Australia and the Pacific Community.

 

Media contact:

Evlyn Mani, SPC Capacity Development & Communications Officer, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it or +679 3249 222

Last Updated on Wednesday, 26 July 2017 09:55  

Newsflash

Distinguished Guests, and Colleagues,

It is with much pleasure as Director of the SOPAC Division of the SPC that I present to you this morning the Keynote Address for this Conference, the largest of its kind in the region and which was set up to showcase new tools and concepts for improved data collection, capabilities and analysis in GIS and Remote Sensing. At the same time I would like to acknowledge Dr Jimmie Rodgers the Director General of the SPC who is unable to be here today and he gives his apologies.

Firstly, however it would be remiss of me if I did not take this opportunity to welcome all of you here this morning to the Opening of this Conference, and in particular I extend a welcome to all representatives of island governments and administrations, donor partner representatives, representatives of CROP organisations, educationalists, scientists and technologists from other stakeholder groups including NGOs. In particular I would like to highlight the many representatives from the private sector, including satellite data providers, image resellers, software and hardware companies. We have gathered here in the room a genuine mix of providers, developers and users.

Secondly, I would like to acknowledge that I have been privileged to address this conference over recent years and in that context I would like to acknowledge that having something different to say has never been difficult. GIS and Remote Sensing is one of the fastest developing technologies no matter whether you are a provider, and developer or a user.

On the global agenda the outcome of Rio+20 this year "The Future We Want" contains a particular paragraph of relevance:
274. We recognize the importance of space-technology-based data, in situ monitoring, and reliable geospatial information for sustainable development policy-making, programming and project operations.

And here in the region and for the benefit of Pacific island countries and territories we are all striving to stay at the "cutting edge of the technology."  In this regard the theme of this Conference focusing on mapping Pacific resources is very timely.