SPC Geoscience Division

PacSAFE Project

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pacsafe

The PacSAFE project is a response to demand from Pacific Island Countries for tools to better understand disaster impacts. The project will engage with representatives from national disaster management offices and related agencies who are involved in planning, preparing and responding to natural disasters. Geoscience Australia, as Australia’s technical implementing partner, will continue development of the functionality of the PacSAFE software tool. PacSAFE is a desktop tool based on QGIS and InaSAFE, designed and developed for non‑GIS users.

Geoscience Australia, as Australia’s technical implementing partner, will continue development of the functionality of the PacSAFE software tool. PacSAFE is a desktop tool based on QGIS and InaSAFE, designed and developed for non‑GIS users. PacSAFE1 was initially developed by the Pacific Community for urban planners to enable hazard data and asset data, such as the Pacific Catastrophic Risk and Financing Initiative (PCRAFI) asset database. In the current project, the PacSAFE tool will be enabled to produce realistic disaster impact scenarios by combining spatial hazard with exposure data. It will provide a simple tool for users to interrogate hazard and impact scenarios within the context of the local knowledge of their communities. This will support users in making informed decisions for disaster response and to develop evidence-based policies for enhancing disaster resilience

Last Updated on Friday, 30 September 2016 14:52  

Newsflash

President, National Authorising Officer, Director -Office of Environment and Emergency Management, Ladies and Gentlemen

Kasaleilia,

On behalf of the Director-General of the Secretariat of the Pacific Community, Dr Jimmie Rodgers, I extend a warm welcome to all who are here, to witness this occasion. This ground breaking ceremony will mark the commencement of construction of the new national Emergency Operation Centre. While it has taken some time to reach this stage, we are happy to see that work is about to start, and I would like to thank Andrew Yatilman and his team from the Office of Environment and Emergency Management (OEEM) for coordinating implementation of the Disaster Risk Reduction project, also known as the B-Envelope project, particularly Tony Neth, who has been directly involved. I would also like to acknowledge the contribution of the European Union who fund the B-Envelope project, where the sum of €1.5 million is allocated towards disaster management, including the construction of this building.

My affiliation with this project goes back a number of years. In March 2007, I visited Pohnpei as a consultant, to develop FSM’s Country Implementation Plan for this project. It is therefore a very special occasion, to be back here again, to bear witness and officiate in this ceremony, to implement this Plan.