SPC Geoscience Division

Home News & Media Releases Latest Video: Tracking Tuvalu Tides

Video: Tracking Tuvalu Tides

E-mail Print PDF

The nation of Tuvalu is made up of nine low-lying islands scattered across the surface of the equatorial Pacific Ocean.  These islands are home to over 11 thousand people and for them, the sea is a major source of food.  However, the ebb and flow of the tides has also brought change to these islands.

The sea level monitoring station in Funafuti, the capital of Tuvalu, is one of 13 located throughout the Pacific region and undergoing maintenance. For the past 20 years it has been collecting and analysing vital data in tracking Tuvalu tides.  These monitoring stations help to better predict and prepare for the extreme high tide which, in turn helps prevent great loss to personal property.  Other vital services also depend on this important information e.g. infrastructure, large buildings etc.

The monitoring stations are part of the Australian Government- funded Pacific Sea Level Monitoring Project in partnership with the Australian Bureau of Meteorology’s Climate and Ocean Support Program, Geoscience Australia, Pacific Island Governments and the Secretariat of the Pacific Community’s Geoscience Division (GSD).

Click "Read More" below to watch video.


Last Updated on Thursday, 19 March 2015 13:06  

Newsflash

Thursday 26 September 2013, Secretariat of the Pacific Community (SPC), Nadi, Fiji - Eighteen disaster risk management trainers from Cook Islands, Fiji, Palau, Samoa, Solomon Islands, Tuvalu and Vanuatu are in Nadi, Fiji this week (23–27 September) attending a Training for Instructors course. The aim is to develop a stronger network of trainers to support, organise and conduct disaster risk management courses in their home countries.

The Secretariat of the Pacific Community (SPC), in collaboration with The Asia Foundation (TAF), is facilitating the training, with support from the regional Pacific Disaster Risk Management Training Programme funded by USAID and the European Union.

The course is targeted at individuals who have played an active role in disaster risk management training activities and programmes in their countries and who will be available after the course to assist with and contribute to national disaster risk management capacity development.

The participants have a range of training experience, with new trainers attending the course for the first time through to experienced trainers attending the course as a final refresher before delivering training for trainers in their home countries.

After the course, the new trainers will be provided opportunities to further build their experience and training skills through participation and co-facilitation of disaster risk management courses which include: introduction to disaster management, initial damage assessment, disaster risk reduction, evacuation centre management, emergency operations centre and exercise management.