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Fiji gains from Pacific Disaster Net training

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The SOPAC-organized Pacific Disaster Net user-training was held recently for the staff of the Fiji National Disaster Management Office as well as other selected Government employees. SOPAC provides assistance to 21 island countries in the Pacific region through applied geoscience and technology.

The Pacific Disaster Net is a website that provides Disaster Risk Management partners in the Pacific, in-country information that addresses disaster management issues as well as assisting in development decision making. The partners include government agencies, regional bodies, non-government organizations and international agencies.

The training, funded under the ACP-EU Natural Disaster Facility, was focused on developing a better understanding of the website, its contents and its functions as well as to encourage “a keenness to use the Pacific Disaster Net on a daily basis.”

The training in Fiji was the first of a series that will be held in other Pacific island countries.


Photo: Participants in the first Pacific Disaster Net training session.

For further information contact Jutta May on 3381377

Last Updated on Tuesday, 03 May 2011 17:09  

Newsflash

12th November, 2013 – Around 150 Geographic Information System and Remote Sensing (GIS/RS) users and stakeholders from around the Pacific region will gather in Suva next week for the 2013 Pacific GIS/RS User Conference. The Conference runs from Monday 18th November to Friday 22nd November.

This year’s theme of the conference is “Connecting the Pacific with Maps”. Cutting edge advancements in GIS/RS technologies will be presented and discussed in-depth as well as an array of applications including the management of resources in small island Pacific nations.  

GIS is a computer-based tool used to collect, combine and overlay information in the form of easily understood maps constructed from up-to-date satellite images and field data.  Whereas, remote sensing is the collection of information from afar using sensors on aircraft, satellites, ships and other vessels. Together, the two can be used to make critical decisions about the physical and built environment.

The conference will be opened by Professor Michael Petterson, Director of Applied Geoscience and Technology Division, Secretariat of the Pacific Community (SPC).

“SPC recognises the power and versatility of GIS and its ability to combine, synthesise, model and present disparate geographical data sets. The demand for GIS and its applications to Pacific Development grows year on year. In a similar vein satellite and airborne data improves in quality and resolution at a frightening pace. The increasing usage of this powerful imagery and data allows rapid and accurate assessments of resources, land use, and environmental issues as never before. SPC is proud to be part of such a modern and forward looking meeting and welcomes all delegates to come and assist with the Pacific development agenda”, Professor Petterson commented.

Current and upcoming trends in the geographic technology fields such as LiDAR (light detection and ranging), Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV), recent progress in vegetation and land cover mapping, improvements in satellite technologies, applications in disaster reduction and climate change adaption, web mapping and open source software will be discussed during the conference.