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Youth raise awareness on Non-communicable Diseases workshop in Noumea

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Youth raise awareness on Non-communicable Diseases

23 Aug 2017 | Noumea

Youth from Pacific Island countries and territories have gathered in Noumea, New Caledonia this week for a five-day media and communications training on Noncommunicable Diseases (NDCs). The training organized by the Pacific Community (SPC) and the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) Pacific Office in Fiji with funding support from the Fond Pacific (France), developed the competence of youth groups from the Pacific ranging from 15-25 years old.

Young people from Fiji, New Zealand, Tonga, Vanuatu, Wallis & Futuna, French Polynesia and New Caledonia were selected through a competitive process requiring them to submit film project ideas about NCDs. This week’s workshop provided an opportunity for each group to refine their stories ideas and provide some guidance on promotion and marketing.

Once competed, each film will be disseminated though social media and used as advocacy and health promotion material in the region.

A group of public health and media professionals will be following and supporting each group throughout the life of the project.

While the groups came from across the Pacific, they were united in their passion for tackling the challenge of NDC’s.

According to Jaimeem Kenni from Vanuatu, “People in general do not consider Noncommunicable Diseases a youth issue, that’s a mistake! We are all affected one way or another. We need to be part of the solution.”

Dr Paula Vivili,‎ Director of Public Health Division at SPC highlighted the importance of bringing a spotlight to NCDs and noted the relevance and the value of having this message delivered by the regions youth: “The fact is that risk factors now develop at a younger age and increasingly diseases like diabetes and even heart diseases affect young people in this region. It is essential to engage youth in the response and not just as an audience of prevention messages but as active participants and partners of that prevention.”

Reflecting on the complexity of NCDs, Ferdinand Strobel, the Health and Development Adviser for the UNDP Pacific Office in Fiji, reiterated the importance of a consolidated approach to combatting one of the region’s most leading causes of death.

“NCDs are driven by the consumption of unhealthy products like tobacco, alcohol and junk food which are heavily promoted to the younger generation”, said Strobel.

“The rise of NCDs -just like climate change- results form an unsustainable development pathway. He added, “We need to change that, it is everyone’s business to get involved and the time is now because the risk factors of today are the diseases of tomorrow.”

‎Non-communicable Diseases constitute the leading cause of premature death and pose a formidable development challenge for the 21st century.

The challenge is particularly relevant in the Pacific region, which suffers from some of the highest NDC rates in the world.

For more information, or interviews please contact:


Peter Foster, Communications Director, Pacific Community,Tel: (+679) 337 9451, Email:  This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Jone Tuiipelehaki Raqauqau, Communications Associate, Effective Governance, UNDP Pacific Office in Fiji, Tel: (679) 3227 552, E:  This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Last Updated on Thursday, 14 September 2017 10:38  

Newsflash

Source: Matangi Tonga Online. Republished With Editor's Permission.

The Pacific Islands need to protect their deep sea minerals, Tonga's Deputy Prime Minister Hon. Samiu Vaipulu told a Pacific-ACP States Regional Workshop on Deep Sea Minerals Law and Contract Negotiations that opened at the Fa'onelua Convention Centre, in Nuku'alofa today on March 11.

Representatives of 15 Pacific States are attending the week-long workshop.

Mike Petterson the Director of SOPAC, the Applied Geoscience and Technology Division of the Secretariat of the Pacific Community (SPC), said today that the workshop will focus on the legislative and regulatory aspects of deep sea minerals.

He said the workshop is aimed at sharing information on a number of developments that SOPAC is working on, including developing legislation for the extraction of deep sea minerals. "What we want achieve is largely capacity building, as like any other economic activity, Pacific states are a little bit compromised by multinational and well-resourced companies coming in," he said.

"We need to know how to negotiate and drive a hard deal. We have to prepare ourselves as best we can by developing our negotiating skills, along with a network of people that we trust and know, and to work with industries and countries that we feel that will be responsible and want a long-term working relationship, and for our communities to benefit while the environment is protected as best we can."

Mike said some Pacific Island countries already had legislation for deep sea minerals. But it was a new thing for the Pacific Islanders to consider who has the rights to the minerals, who gains from it and how can we put in place a transparent system, while looking at the environmental issues, he said.

He said for decades the main issue had been the lack of knowledge as to where minerals are, what type of minerals are out there, as there are many deposits to discover in the ocean.

"But we are now at a point where there are few areas in the Pacific that have been identified to be attractive and that's a breakthrough. Now it is becoming an economic reality and to make sure that countries maximize the benefits, which is never easy and requires hard work so we want representatives to walk away armed with more knowledge and be aware of the range of issues we have to cope with," he said.