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New Framework to build resilience to climate change and disasters in the Pacific Islands

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16 September 2016, Suva - Pacific Leaders’ endorsement of the Framework for Resilient Development in the Pacific (FRDP), the world’s first integrated regional framework to build resilience to climate change and disasters, has been applauded by Pacific regional and international organisations.

The Framework aims to ensure that climate change and disasters are understood as a development challenge with priority actions to address vulnerability to climate change and disasters and build resilience across all sectors.

The FRDP provides high level voluntary guidance to national governments and administrations, the private sector, civil society organisations, Pacific communities, regional organisations, and development partners.

The FRDP advocates for the adoption of integrated approaches, whenever possible, for addressing climate change and disaster risks, in order to make more efficient use of resources, to rationalise multiple sources of funding, and for more effective mainstreaming of risks into development planning and budgets.

The Framework is closely aligned to implementing global agreements such as the Paris Agreement, the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction and the Sustainable Development Goals to help build a more sustainable and safer region.

A new Pacific Resilience Partnership (PRP) will coordinate cooperation as well as implement and monitor the FRDP. The Pacific Island Forum Leaders approved a Working Group to establish the structure of the Partnership.

The FRDP was developed in response to recommendations from the Pacific Platform for Disaster Risk Management and Pacific Climate Change Roundtable in 2011 and endorsed by the Pacific Island Forum Leaders in 2012. An extensive and inclusive consultation process was undertaken over the last three years with Pacific Island countries and territories (PICTs). Input was also received via regional meetings, sector dialogues and an online tool that drew submissions from around the world.

The development of the FRDP was supported by a Steering Committee comprising of representatives from PICTs, civil society and the private sector. A Technical Working Group provided technical advice and support to this process and comprises representatives from the Pacific Community (SPC), the Secretariat of the Pacific Regional Environment Programme (SPREP), Pacific Island Forum Secretariat (PIFS), United Nations Office of Disaster Risk Reduction (UNISDR), United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), and the University of the South Pacific (USP).

The development of the FRDP has been supported with funding from various sources including: the European Union through the Building Safety and Resilience in the Pacific (BSRP) project and Global Climate Change Alliance (GCCA); the Australian Government (DFAT) through the International Climate Change Initiative (ICCAI) and funding for SPREP and SPC; the Government of Sweden support for the Pacific Climate Change Roundtable through SPREP; and United States Agency for International Development (USAID) through the USAID Institutional Strengthening in Pacific Island Countries to Adapt to Climate Change (ISACC) project.

The Framework for Resilient Development in the Pacific: An Integrated Approach to Address Climate Change and Disaster Risk Management (FRDP) was endorsed by Leaders during the 47th Pacific Island Forum meeting in the Federated States of Micronesia.

For more information please see: http://gsd.spc.int/frdp

 

 

Media contacts

Clare White, SPC Policy Adviser, Climate Change and Disaster Risk Management, +679 9165794.  [email protected] //

Nanette Woonton, SPREP Communication Officer +685 21929 [email protected] //

Last Updated on Monday, 19 September 2016 10:54  

Newsflash

16 April 2013 - A survey of the South Tarawa lagoon has revealed some potentially explosive secrets from its past as one of the major battlegrounds of WWII. The survey was designed to identify battle debris that still litters the floor of the lagoon seventy years after the infamous Battle of Tarawa in 1943.

Funded by the New Zealand Regional Ocean Sciences Grant, the survey was undertaken as part of the Government’s work to reduce the atoll’s damaging reliance on beach mining by identifying potential sources of construction aggregate on the floor of the Tarawa Lagoon. The widespread practice of beach mining has been weakening the atoll’s vulnerable shoreline along with Government efforts to protect communities from the worsening impacts of climate change and rising sea levels.

The Government turned to SOPAC, the region’s Applied Geoscience & Technology Division of the Secretariat of the Pacific Community, for guidance on safe methods to dredge an alternative source of sand and gravel from Tarawa’s southern lagoon. Before dredging can begin, as part of the European-Union funded Environmentally Safe Aggregate for Tarawa (ESAT) project, SOPAC first needed to identify any potential problems that might be posed by any unidentified and unexploded ordnance.

During WWII, the islands of Kiribati saw some of the Pacific’s bloodiest encounters.  From 20-24 November 1943, an invasion flotilla of 18,000 US Naval and Marine Corps troops attacked the fortified Japanese garrison on Betio in Southern Tarawa. The 4,600 Japanese defenders fought almost to the last man, and more than 1,000 Americans lost their lives.

SOPAC’s Survey Leader, Geophysicist Robert Smith, is still analysing the data but he has already identified two previously unknown vessel wrecks and unearthed numerous artillery remnants. Of the vessels, Smith says, “These may be sunken Higgins boats, which would have carried 20-30 marines each.” The US government has already expressed a keen interest in Smith’s findings.