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Strengthening disaster risk management in Palau States

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Koror, 5 August, 2016
Representatives from 16 States in Palau have completed an Introduction to Disaster Management (IDM) training course with Palau’s National Emergency Management Office (NEMO) to strengthen their capacity in disaster preparedness and response.

The three-day training (2-4 August), supported by the European Union funded Building Safety and Resilience in the Pacific Project which is implemented by the Pacific Community (SPC), aimed to assist the participants who will be the focal points when their respective State Disaster Risk Management Plans will be reviewed in order to be consistent with the recently drafted National Disaster Risk Management Framework.

“The strengthening of the 16 States Disaster Risk Management Plans is the way forward to ensure that the States can better support the victims in their jurisdiction before the national support can be mobilised,” NEMO Coordinator, Priscilla Subris said.

“The participants will be actively involved in the review of their state DRM Plans which will follow immediately after the training,” Ms Subris added.

The IDM training was developed by the USAID funded Pacific Disaster Risk Management Training Programme, which is housed in the Geoscience Division of SPC.

The training equipped participants with basic information about hazards (natural and human induced), their impact on communities during disasters, the relationship between disasters and development, legislations, plans and programmes as well as community level management.

The training was facilitated by SPC’s North Pacific Disaster Risk Management Officer, Noa Tokavou and Jowana Nabuci, a regional trainer from Fiji,

Media contacts:
Ms Priscilla Subris, Coordinator Palau National Emergency Management Office,   This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it / This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it ;  Ph: +680 587 6366 (w),
Ph: +680 587 6367 (w), Ph: +680 775 3666 (m)
Mr. Noa Tokavou, SPC’s North Pacific Regional Office, Pohnpei, FSM, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it , +691 320 7523, +691 924 3004

Background
The ACP-EU Building Safety and Resilience in the Pacific project has the objective is to reduce the vulnerability as well as the social, economic and environmental costs of disasters caused by natural hazards, thereby achieving regional and national sustainable development and poverty reduction goals in Africa Caribbean Pacific (ACP) Pacific Island States. Implemented by SPC, it will also maximise synergies between disaster risk reduction strategies and climate change adaptation. The total value of the project is € 19,367,000.

Last Updated on Friday, 19 August 2016 12:01  

Newsflash

This year Kiribati, one of the least developed countries in the world, finalised maritime boundaries with the United States of America.

The successful outcome, in September, was the result of the work that the Pacific Island country, along with 12 others, undertook at the Maritime Boundaries and Ocean Governance working sessions at the University of Sydney.

The latest session is currently underway at the University and ends on 6 December.

"Technical and legal personnel from thesePacific Islandcountries have been coming to the University of Sydney for the last six years to secure rights to their marine spaces," said Professor Elaine Baker from the University's School of Geosciences, which hosts the meetings.

"Global interest in marine resources, including fisheries and seabed minerals, and the threat of climate change and sea level rise, has spurred Pacific Island countries to settle their maritime boundaries."

The Cook Islands, for example, has valuable deposits of seabed minerals, many of which are essential to new technologies such as renewable energy and communications equipment. In order for the Cook Islands to capitalise on these resources, they require sound governance frameworks and jurisdictional boundaries.