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Risk Reduction

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Baseline Data and Information

There is still something of a paucity of accurate baseline data and information to support informed decision-making on matters of disaster risk reduction and by extension on sustainable national development. While some attempts are being made by DRP supported by the Asian Development Bank, World Bank, Institute of Geological and Nuclear Science, New Zealand AIR Worldwide and the Pacific Disaster Center, to establish national and regional risk databases there must be more support from partners and relevant national agencies.

Scientific and Technical Assessments

In relation to the provision of baseline data and information there is a need to expand the knowledge base regarding DRM and climate change in the Pacific through risk assessments, modelling and mapping, post-disaster physical, socio-economic, and environmental damage and loss assessments across all sectors such as agriculture and tourism and lifeline services such as water, to inform decision making and build resilience. In this connection there is also need to incorporate best practices and lessons learned from traditional DRM practices with applied scientific and technical methodologies and approaches.

Early Warning Systems

The PICTs continue to be challenged by the physical remoteness of many communities in terms of developing and supporting end-to-end multi-hazard early warning systems appropriate and sustainable within the region. In this regard there is a need for increased investments in community preparedness, and to continue support for relevant technical agencies such as national meteorological and hydrological services, and as well to identify new and innovative approaches through dialogue and exchanges with our partners.

For more information, contact:

1. This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
Senior Advisor Risk Reduction

2. Mereoni Ketewai
Assistant Risk Mapping Officer

Last Updated on Thursday, 05 February 2015 07:10  


The World GIS Day, celebrated on 14th November every year, offers everyone a chance to learn more about the fascinating field of Geographic Information Systems and how GIS is part of our everyday lives today. 

"Many young people are using GIS technology every day without even realising it. Many smart phone applications and social media tools combine data with maps to deliver unique services to consumers and Google Earth is known by most of us" advised Dr Wulf Killmann Team Leader of the SPC/GIZ project “Coping with Climate Change in the Pacific Island Region” and Dr Russell Howorth, Director of the Applied Geoscience and Technology Division of the Secretariat of the Pacific Community in a joint statement released to recognise World GIS Day.

GIS (Geographic Information Systems) are a set of computer-based tools used to collect, combine and overlay information in the form of easily understood maps constructed from up-to-date satellite images and field data, while remote sensing is the collection of information about the earth from a distance.

In the Pacific, GIS is now being used as a tool to map landslides, detect vegetation change, map town boundaries, map impacts of sea level rise and many more. GIS is quite useful in the area of utility, transportation, and might become a tool to model climate change.

Applied Geoscience and Technology Division (SOPAC) of Secretariat of the Pacific Community is the leading agency for GIS in the Pacific and hold images and GIS Data for its member countries and territories. SOPAC's primary goal is to apply geoscientific data and technology to realise new opportunities for improving the livelihoods of Pacific communities. SOPAC's work in GIS and remote sensing is supported by many partners including the German Government through the SPC/GIZ, Coping with Climate Change in the Pacific Island region.

While GIS practitioners around the world celebrates this day by holding workshops, seminars. The SOPAC division of SPC, supported by many partners, is working tirelessly to organise a conference held each year for all Pacific island countries and territories.