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Pacific community marks World Water Day

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20 March 2015, Suva - On 22 March each year, Pacific Island countries and territories pause to acknowledge and celebrate the importance of their fresh water resources to sustainable development.

 



However, with World Water Day on Sunday falling a little over a week since the region experienced a severe tropical cyclone, the thoughts of the Secretariat of the Pacific Community (SPC) and people across the Pacific are with those affected by cyclone Pam.

The cyclone has left thousands with limited or no access to safe drinking water and sanitation, dramatically demonstrating the region’s vulnerability to the water-related impacts of climate variability and climate change.

The extent of the drinking water and sanitation needs for those affected by the cyclone – in particular in Kiribati, Tuvalu and Vanuatu – is being determined by their respective governments who are leading the response.

The World Health Organisation and UNICEF recently estimated that around half the population of the Pacific has access to improved water supplies, while only one-third has access to improved sanitation.

 

This means that, across the region, more than 6.6 million people continue to live without access to safe sanitation and more than 4.5 million people endure potentially unsafe drinking water.  Most of these people live in rural areas or remote outer islands, and in growing informal urban settlements.

According to SPC Director General, Colin Tukuitonga, addressing this serious development issue is a challenge that requires a fundamental shift in efforts by countries and partners.

“World Water Day is a time for us in the Pacific to acknowledge that water is everybody’s business, and that increased efforts are required at all levels to help secure safe water and sanitation for all, in all conditions,” Dr Tukuitonga said.

Speaking at Fiji’s national World Water Day celebrations in Nadi today (Friday), SPC Water, Sanitation and Hygiene Officer Iva Koroisamanunu acknowledged the challenge ahead for families seeking to restore access to safe drinking water and sanitation following cyclone Pam.

“For many Pacific communities, maintaining daily access to safe drinking water and sanitation is already a significant challenge,” Ms Koroisamanunu said.  “In the Pacific, the serious impacts of climate variability and natural hazards can make this challenge even more difficult,” she said.

Media contacts:

Rhonda Robinson, Deputy Director, SPC Water and Sanitation Programme, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it or +679 9934770
Dave Hebblethwaite, Water Governance Coordinator, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it or +679 9983059

NOTES TO EDITORS

The Secretariat of the Pacific Community (SPC) has a Water and Sanitation Programme that works across the region to assist Pacific island countries and territories demonstrate the benefits of improved water and sanitation management on the ground. This work is made possible with the support of many partners, among them the New Zealand Aid Programme and the European Union.

The theme of World Water Day 2015 is Water and Sustainable Development. More information on World Water Day can be found at www.unwater.org/worldwaterday.

More information on water management in the Pacific can be found at www.pacificwater.org.

Last Updated on Thursday, 04 June 2015 10:42  

Newsflash

12th November, 2013 – Around 150 Geographic Information System and Remote Sensing (GIS/RS) users and stakeholders from around the Pacific region will gather in Suva next week for the 2013 Pacific GIS/RS User Conference. The Conference runs from Monday 18th November to Friday 22nd November.

This year’s theme of the conference is “Connecting the Pacific with Maps”. Cutting edge advancements in GIS/RS technologies will be presented and discussed in-depth as well as an array of applications including the management of resources in small island Pacific nations.  

GIS is a computer-based tool used to collect, combine and overlay information in the form of easily understood maps constructed from up-to-date satellite images and field data.  Whereas, remote sensing is the collection of information from afar using sensors on aircraft, satellites, ships and other vessels. Together, the two can be used to make critical decisions about the physical and built environment.

The conference will be opened by Professor Michael Petterson, Director of Applied Geoscience and Technology Division, Secretariat of the Pacific Community (SPC).

“SPC recognises the power and versatility of GIS and its ability to combine, synthesise, model and present disparate geographical data sets. The demand for GIS and its applications to Pacific Development grows year on year. In a similar vein satellite and airborne data improves in quality and resolution at a frightening pace. The increasing usage of this powerful imagery and data allows rapid and accurate assessments of resources, land use, and environmental issues as never before. SPC is proud to be part of such a modern and forward looking meeting and welcomes all delegates to come and assist with the Pacific development agenda”, Professor Petterson commented.

Current and upcoming trends in the geographic technology fields such as LiDAR (light detection and ranging), Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV), recent progress in vegetation and land cover mapping, improvements in satellite technologies, applications in disaster reduction and climate change adaption, web mapping and open source software will be discussed during the conference.