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Fijian ring ditch at Monasavu

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When Robert Smith as Senior Advisor Marine Geophysicist at SOPAC began his exploration of the Monasavu Hydro to determine the amount of sedimentation in the lake, as part of a survey that he began in 1991, in reviewing the data collected with state of the art mapping tools he found more than sedimentation, he discovered a Fijian ring ditch.

The use of the Fijian ring ditch was used for fortification, found all over the country and dates back hundreds and hundreds of years.

Mr. Smith shared his find during his presentation to participants in the SOPAC/STAR meeting in Nadi recently.

Because the lake was never cleared of trees and bush when it was filled, the ring ditch was never discovered. But it is now very much a part of the lakebed sitting under 10 metres of water at Monasavu.  The ring ditch is shown in the lower centre end of the reservoir (circled)

As for the sedimentation?  Mr. Smith said that it would take at least 93 years before the sediment would begin to impact on the minimum operating water level of the reservoir.  Sediment for years and years to come will not affect the hydro operation.

 

Last Updated on Tuesday, 03 May 2011 17:02  

Newsflash

Wednesday 4 December 2014, Secretariat of the Pacific Community (SPC) headquarters, Noumea, New Caledonia - The Secretariat of the Pacific Community (SPC) strengthened their commitment in building their capacity to meet the needs of disabled persons with the official opening of the Publications and Library Section at the Geoscience Division (GSD) – GSD’s first facilities with disabled access.

In conjunction with an official visit to the Division by SPC’s Director General on Wednesday 24 November 2014, Dr Colin Tukuitonga officially opened the newly refurbished facilities with a ribbon cutting and a strong commitment by SPC to enable those with disabilities through improving SPC’s facilities to meet their needs. Speaking to staff and honoured guests, Dr Tukuitonga recognised the efforts of GSD.

‘What you've done in effect is give meaning and a concrete example and acknowledgement of the fact that we somehow need to be much more practical in our thinking about enabling people with disabilities,’ Dr Tukuitonga said.