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Regional Maritime Boundaries

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The Regional Maritime Boundaries Sector (RMB) has been implemented by OIP since 2001 and is currently fully funded by Australian Aid. The Sector undertakes all work in accordance with the provisions of the UN Convention on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS) and aims to assist pacific island countries to develop, promulgate and declare their respective maritime boundaries and likewise develop technical solutions towards ratified treaties between neighbours with overlapping marine zones.

MB

In particular, the sector aims to:

  • Provide maritime boundaries delimitation data and information for the member countries to assist in preparation of claims for delimitation of their Exclusive Economic Zones;

  • Develop comprehensive data-sets which facilitate definition of the legal and administrative offshore limits for member countries, in accordance with the provisions of UNCLOS;

  • Build national capacity within member countries to undertake these assessments;

  • Provide advice and assistance to member countries on relevant provisions of UNCLOS;

  • Act as an information and data repository.

The RMB also assists those with extended continental shelf (eCS) potential to delineate these areas and submit claims to the UN Commission on the Limits of the Continental Shelf (UNCLCS).

Successful maritime boundaries development work is a process which includes technical (geomorphological/geodetic/cartographic), legal (legislative review and legal drafting) and diplomatic understanding and engagement. The processes cannot be brought to a successful conclusion, nor can sustainable progress be achieved, where any one of these three components is absent.

For more information contact:

Malakai Vakautawale

Maritime Boundaries Adviser

Andrick Lal
Senior Geodatic Surveyor

Filimoni Yaya
Geospatial Assistant

 

 


Last Updated on Monday, 23 April 2018 11:48  


Newsflash

Welcome to the first newsletter from the SPC-EU Pacific Deep Sea.

The SPC-EU Pacific Deep Sea Minerals Project is helping Pacific Island countries to improve the governance and management their deep-sea minerals resources. The Project is helping the  countries to improve legal frameworks, increase technical capacity and to develop effective monitoring systems.

The Pacific Deep Sea Minerals Project is funded by the European Union and managed by SOPAC, the Applied Geoscience & Technology Division of the Secretariat of the Pacific Community, on behalf of 15 Pacific Island Countries: the Cook Islands, Federated States of Micronesia, Fiji, Kiribati, Marshall Islands, Nauru, Niue, Palau, Papua New Guinea, Samoa, Solomon Islands, Timor Leste, Tonga, Tuvalu and Vanuatu.

The 4-year (2011-2014) SPC-EU Pacific Deep Sea Minerals Project is the first major initiative designed to regulate this new activity in a coordinated way within the Pacific Region. The  national €4.4 million governments EU-funded develop project the is designed legal, fiscal to help and environment management frameworks needed to ensure that any exploitation of deep sea minerals will directly support national economic development while also minimizing any negative impacts on the environment and local communities.

In This Issue:

  • Tonga Workshop Builds Vital Contract Negotiation Skills
  • SPC Director, Dr Jimmie Rodgers talks Deep Sea Minerals
  • Tonga Workshop Highlights Need for Greater Integration between Government & Civil Society Organisations
  • Staff Profile: Akuila Tawake
  • Project Highlights
  • Upcoming Events

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