SPC Geoscience Division

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GeoScience for Development Programme

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The GeoScience for Development Programme (G4D) provides vital applied ocean, island and coastal geoscience services to SPC member countries. These technical services are strategically deployed in response to member requests for assistance in the development, management and monitoring of natural resources and unique island environmental systems and processes.

We help members to better:

  • Govern and develop their natural resources;

  • Increase their resilience to natural hazards;

  • Access data-based approaches to adaptation.

Services

G4D is unique in the region. We maintain and deliver specialist skills, tools and services through flexible, integrated approaches designed to meet the needs of pacific island communities and environments. G4D is committed to bringing these services to members in an effective and timely manner. We continually strive to build "hands-on" capacity in the countries where we work, in all sectors of ocean and island applied geosciences.

Some of these services include:

  • Ocean and coastal resource characterisation, resource use solutions, monitoring and development;

  • Provision of science-based ocean and coastal policy and governance support and advice;

  • Provision of strategic communication and advocacy for coastal and ocean resource policy;

  • Strategic alliances with regional and international parters in technical, research and development assistance;

  • Capacity building via specific initiatives or through "hands-on" joint implementation of works;

  • Science-based vulnerability assessments particularly in shoreline and coastal zones;

  • Science-based adaptation responses;

  • Continued secure investment in instrumentation, tools and support services as the only regional technological facility in geoscience.

Critical Issues

In addition to the above, the following five critical issues are embedded throughout the G4D's work program:

  1. Coastal development, Urbanisation and Vulnerability
  2. Maritime Boundaries
  3. Climate Change and Adaptation
  4. Natural Resource Development
  5. Information Management and Analysis

The strong applied geoscience capacity of G4D also provides support for scientific and research interaction with other regional and international technical entities. We maintain a number of unique research and development partnerships, acting as a conduit for improved understanding of pacific island research needs to development partners and the international arena. G4D will continue to create, maintain and disseminate geoscience knowledge to provide technical advice to pacific island governments and to support policy development and decision making.

Last Updated on Thursday, 19 March 2015 12:13  


Newsflash

22 August 2013 - Secretariat of the Pacific Community - Suva, Fiji - Better preparing communities for cyclones, floods, droughts, and predicted sea level rise is a top priority for many Pacific island nations. The urgency to prepare however, does not justify cutting corners.

Climate change adaptation planning should follow the same national processes as any development, with environmental impact assessments, technical surveys, and cost benefit analyses.

This was the argument Dr. Arthur Webb of the Secretariat of the Pacific Community’s Applied Geo Science and Technology Division (SOPAC) presented to a diverse audience of students, academics and development practitioners at USP Marine Science Campus on Thursday 17th August.

“Nine out of ten communities want a sea wall,” said Dr. Webb, an expert in coastal processes, “but putting concrete over a healthy beach system is an example of maladaptation. It will do more harm than good. Not only will it disrupt the flow of sediments, in many cases increasing erosion, but it’s terrible for tourism.”

Webb displayed examples of maladaptation that had been carried out in the Pacific. In one instance, mangroves were planted on an atoll coastline where they were not naturally occurring.