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Disaster Reduction Programme

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The Disaster Reduction Programme (DRP) provides technical and policy advice and support to strengthen disaster risk management practices in Pacific Island Countries and Territories. The Programme carries out this responsibility in coordination and collaboration with other technical programme areas within SOPAC and also with a range of regional and international development partners and donors.

The overarching policy guidance for DRP is the Pacific Disaster Risk Reduction and Disaster Management Framework for Action 2005-2015 (Pacific DRR and DM Framework for Action) which supports and advocates for the building of safer and more resilient communities to disasters. The Pacific DRR and DM Framework for Action was approved by Pacific leaders in 2005. It is linked to the global Hyogo Framework for Action 2005 – 2015 which was endorsed by World leaders following the Second World Conference on Disaster Reduction in January 2005.

The other significant regional policy instruments that help to guide the efforts of the DRP are the Pacific Plan and the Pacific Islands Framework for Action on Climate Change 2006 – 2015.

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Last Updated on Tuesday, 24 September 2013 18:19  


In response to the recent negative press, particularly from the media outside of the Pacific islands, regarding the vulnerability of our islands to climate change and sea-level rise, the Director of the SOPAC Secretariat, Dr. Russell Howorth, convened a press conference to correct this misconception.

Specifically, these media (and others) have made reference to a recently published article in an international scientific journal co-authored by a senior staff member of the SOPAC Secretariat. Copies of the brief prepared by the senior staff member by way of a response were circulated. The response emphasises that the article addresses the ongoing change in shape, size, and position on the reef platform of 27 low-lying coral islands on four atolls over the past 19-61 years based upon studies of historic air photographs and recent high-resolution satellite imagery. In no way does it make sweeping conclusions that the vulnerability of our islands is reducing particularly with regard to predictions about future impacts of sea-level change.