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Pacific Islands Emergency Services strengthened through partnership

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PIEMA Strengthens patnership

9 Jan 2018 | Suva

The Queensland Ambulance Service (QAS) donated lifesaving equipment to support emergency management services in Pacific this month. The Pacific Community (SPC) and Pacific Islands Emergency Management Alliance (PIEMA) facilitated this handover.

Fiji is the first of five countries to receive the donated equipment valued at AUD 350,000 which included lifesaving devices such as defibrillators, neck collars, backboards and scoop stretchers and are said to significantly improve emergency services.

 

The emergency equipment was officially handed over by the Pacific Islands Emergency Management Alliance (PIEMA) to the National Fire Authority (NFA), St John Ambulance, Airports Fiji Ltd and Vaileka Ambulance Service. Also included in this handover were supplies for the Emergency Departments of the three Tertiary hospitals, Colonial War Memorial (CWM) Hospital, Lautoka Hospital and Labasa hospital.

NFA’s acting chief executive officer, Mileta Seniroqa expressed her gratitude, “We are grateful to them (Queensland Ambulance Service) for considering Fiji’s fire service in the distribution of its donations around the Pacific region. We are happy to receive the equipment, it will greatly help in the efficient delivery of ambulance services to the public,” she said.

This donation was made possible through the twinning programme coordinated by PIEMA, with the cost of transporting the items to the five Pacific Island countries funded by SPC’s Building Safety and Resilience in the Pacific Project, funded by the European Union and ACP Group of States. The twinning arrangement pairs up emergency service providers within developing Pacific Island countries, like Fiji, with emergency service providers in developed countries such as Australia and New Zealand, with the aim of sharing knowledge on best practices to improve emergency response as well as equipment and resources. There are currently 10 formal agreements between Pacific Island countries and twinning partners and as a result of these arrangements, Pacific island countries benefit by not only improving their emergency services through capacity building but also through receiving quality emergency equipment to improve their capabilities.

‘Since starting the twinning arrangement we’ve had experts come to Pacific Island countries to facilitate workshops to upskill first responders and we also had the opportunity to send selected first responders to attend training in Australia and New Zealand. Through this partnership, we hope to offer people in the Pacific the best emergency service, so that when a disaster strikes, we are fully prepared to respond in the best way with safety as our key priority.’ PIEMA Officer Anthony Blake, said.

The partnership founded through PIEMA puts into practice Sustainable Development Goal number 17 which focuses on using partnerships to support and sustain development. PIEMA’s core function is to monitor and co-ordinate partnerships between countries to ensure emergency service providers operating within the Pacific are prepared to adequately respond to any type of emergency.

 

Media Contact:

Vivita Matanimeke Communications Coordinator, Building Safety and Resilience in the Pacific Project | email: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it | Mobile: 9361006

Anthony Blake: PIEMA Officer| email: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Last Updated on Wednesday, 24 January 2018 10:07  

Newsflash

Tuesday, 24 September 2013, Secretariat of the Pacific Community (SPC), Suva, Fiji – Regional experts in land and marine survey and management commended the work of the AusAID-funded Pacific Sea Level Monitoring (PSLM) Project at the International Federation of Surveyors (FIG) Symposium in Suva last week.

Among them was Professor John Hannah of the University of Otago, who chairs the FIG Climate Change Task Force. Addressing the conference, Professor Hannah said, ‘Monitoring is crucial. We need reference systems and data sets that allow us to monitor change accurately.’

‘I congratulate our colleagues in the Pacific Sea Level Monitoring Project ─ thanks to that initiative, many small islands have a reliable continuous data set.  We need to see more of this in the region.’

The project has been collecting data from 14 sites across the Pacific since 1991. Over-water monitoring stations in Fiji, Tonga, Samoa, Vanuatu, Papua New Guinea, Marshall Islands, Pohnpei, Kiribati, Cook Islands, Palau, Tuvalu, and Nauru provide a continuous stream of high-quality data on sea level, tides, water and air temperature, barometric pressure, and windspeed and direction. In addition, land-based global navigation satellite system (GNSS) stations in each country measure seismic movements and provide geodetic benchmarks for the sea-level stations.

All of this data is necessary for scientists to calculate sea-level change relative to land elevation. The data has many other uses, however. It is publically accessible and is frequently referenced for coastal development projects, urban planning, tidal predictions, formulation of maritime boundaries, wave modelling and for navigational purposes.