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EU will provide FJ$10 million through SPC towards recovery and rehabilitation after Cyclone Winston

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The European Union (EU) will provide an initial FJ$ 10 million through the Pacific Community (SPC) to complement the Fijian Government's efforts in relief, recovery and rehabilitation following the devastation caused by Tropical Cyclone Winston.

The funds will immediately be made available from EU-SPC projects for communities and businesses in the most severely affected regions of Fiji.

"The FJ$10M is a direct, practical short term response to the needs of Fijian citizens in the affected areas", says EU Ambassador for the Pacific Andrew Jacobs. "The EU and SPC have joined forces to identify other resources, whether it is through an existing joint programme or a new source that could be expedited and channelled towards re-building peoples' lives".

 

Pacific Community Director-General, Dr Colin Tukuitonga, said “While the full impact of cyclone Winston on lives, livelihoods and the economy is yet to be determined, these funds will be directed towards addressing immediate needs identified by the Fiji government, to alleviate the pressure on some of the most affected communities.”

The projects will assist rehabilitation efforts in the agricultural sector by increasing the supply of key export crops, such as fruits and vegetables. This will foster food security and also contribute to the livelihood of smallholders farmers in affected areas. Support will be targeted to the needs on all levels of the agriculture value chain, including farmers, agri-processing and export companies. In addition, projects will also fast-track resources towards the water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) and rural electricity needs of affected citizens.


Media contacts: Mohammed Nazeem Kasim, EU Press Officer, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it or +679 331 3633
Lauren Robinson, SPC Communications and Public Information This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it or +679 337 9250

Last Updated on Tuesday, 08 March 2016 14:33  

Newsflash

22 August 2013 - Secretariat of the Pacific Community - Suva, Fiji - Better preparing communities for cyclones, floods, droughts, and predicted sea level rise is a top priority for many Pacific island nations. The urgency to prepare however, does not justify cutting corners.

Climate change adaptation planning should follow the same national processes as any development, with environmental impact assessments, technical surveys, and cost benefit analyses.

This was the argument Dr. Arthur Webb of the Secretariat of the Pacific Community’s Applied Geo Science and Technology Division (SOPAC) presented to a diverse audience of students, academics and development practitioners at USP Marine Science Campus on Thursday 17th August.

“Nine out of ten communities want a sea wall,” said Dr. Webb, an expert in coastal processes, “but putting concrete over a healthy beach system is an example of maladaptation. It will do more harm than good. Not only will it disrupt the flow of sediments, in many cases increasing erosion, but it’s terrible for tourism.”

Webb displayed examples of maladaptation that had been carried out in the Pacific. In one instance, mangroves were planted on an atoll coastline where they were not naturally occurring.