SPC Geoscience Division

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Community Based DRM

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Navua training

To minimise the scale of impact and improve on the ground disaster recovery, there is a need to increase community awareness and preparedness programmes, and promote engagement and ownership of ground-level initiatives in DRM and CCA. Involving the community in DRM and CCA is crucial to enhancing resilience particularly in small island countries in the region.

Whilst the bulk of the Disaster Reduction Programme’s work focuses on building national DRM capacity, DRP also has a strong commitment to supporting community based disaster risk management initiatives.

 

Navua launch

 

DRP in partnership with UNDP, NDMO, Fiji Red Cross and Live and Learn are working with communities on the Navua floodplain on reducing their risk to flooding.  The project has brought together local government and the community to improve flood response which included the installation of a flood warning system in Navua.  A flood response plan was developed and Community-based First Aid and Disaster Preparedness Workshops in Serua and Namosi Province carried out in support of this.

Specific services that the Disaster Risk Programme can provide in relation to Community based Disaster Risk  Management are the following:

  • Training support and facilitation of Vulnerability and Capacity Assessments  (VCA)
  • Community based Disaster Preparedness and Emergency Response Planning
  • Particapatory Community based Disaster Risk Reduction Planning
  • Documentation of traditional practices and protocol in Pacific Island countries and territories
  • Advise on integration into national disaster risk management systems

For more information, contact:

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Adviser Community based Disaster Risk Management


Last Updated on Wednesday, 16 February 2011 12:07  


Newsflash

16 April 2013 - A survey of the South Tarawa lagoon has revealed some potentially explosive secrets from its past as one of the major battlegrounds of WWII. The survey was designed to identify battle debris that still litters the floor of the lagoon seventy years after the infamous Battle of Tarawa in 1943.

Funded by the New Zealand Regional Ocean Sciences Grant, the survey was undertaken as part of the Government’s work to reduce the atoll’s damaging reliance on beach mining by identifying potential sources of construction aggregate on the floor of the Tarawa Lagoon. The widespread practice of beach mining has been weakening the atoll’s vulnerable shoreline along with Government efforts to protect communities from the worsening impacts of climate change and rising sea levels.

The Government turned to SOPAC, the region’s Applied Geoscience & Technology Division of the Secretariat of the Pacific Community, for guidance on safe methods to dredge an alternative source of sand and gravel from Tarawa’s southern lagoon. Before dredging can begin, as part of the European-Union funded Environmentally Safe Aggregate for Tarawa (ESAT) project, SOPAC first needed to identify any potential problems that might be posed by any unidentified and unexploded ordnance.

During WWII, the islands of Kiribati saw some of the Pacific’s bloodiest encounters.  From 20-24 November 1943, an invasion flotilla of 18,000 US Naval and Marine Corps troops attacked the fortified Japanese garrison on Betio in Southern Tarawa. The 4,600 Japanese defenders fought almost to the last man, and more than 1,000 Americans lost their lives.

SOPAC’s Survey Leader, Geophysicist Robert Smith, is still analysing the data but he has already identified two previously unknown vessel wrecks and unearthed numerous artillery remnants. Of the vessels, Smith says, “These may be sunken Higgins boats, which would have carried 20-30 marines each.” The US government has already expressed a keen interest in Smith’s findings.